Copyright Law

Our copyright attorneys protect the intellectual property rights of companies in a range of industries, including manufacturing, entertainment, and electronics. We also represent artists, designers, inventors, and technology developers. We are skilled in copyright portfolio management (ownership rights, registration, and renewal) in addition to litigation and transactions involving copyrights.

Our litigators are experienced in resolving copyright infringement actions for both registered and unregistered copyrights and in navigating issues of joint ownership, fair use, public domain, and independent creation. We regularly provide counsel in matters involving safe harbor protections, misappropriation of trade secrets, non-competition agreements, and DMCA enforcement.

On the transactional side, our copyright attorneys conduct due diligence reviews and evaluate target companies’ copyright and other IP assets in connection with joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions, asset sales, and co-branding and distribution agreements.

Key Contacts

All Attorneys

Advise game developer in connection with accusations of copyright infringement and misappropriation of trade secrets.

Resolved numerous copyright infringement actions, for both registered and unregistered copyrights, many involving issues such as joint ownership, fair use, public domain, and independent creation.

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Cohen & Gresser is pleased to announce the expansion of the firm's Litigation & Arbitration practice, as partner Ronald F Wick and associate Erica Lai have joined our Washington, D.C. office. Ron's practice focuses on litigation concerning trade regulation, antitrust, and commercial disputes. He was previously a partner in Cozen O'Connor's  Washington, D.C. office. Erica's practice focuses on complex commercial litigation, including antitrust, False Claims Act, administrative law, copyright litigation, and breach of contract. Prior to joining the firm, Erica was a senior associate at Covington & Burling LLP.

Revelers can celebrate royalty-free, at least for now. Warner/Chappell never owned the rights to the “Happy  Birthday” lyrics, district court judge says.

A discussion on the Cariou v. Prince ruling in the context of determining fair use of existing art in creating new work. The article asks: what qualifies a new piece, which incorporates existing work from peers, as transformative enough to avoid claims of copyright infringement?