Barbara Luse focuses on white collar defense, regulatory enforcement, and corporate transactions, with a particular focus on cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology. Barbara also focuses on art law disputes including fraud, stolen and illegally exported art and antiquities, and restitution matters. Prior to joining Cohen & Gresser, Barbara practiced with John Cahill at Cahill Partners LLP in New York, where she focused on a wide range of art law issues including fraud, insurance litigation, valuation, and restitution. Previously, she worked at Loyens & Loeff in Brussels, Belgium.

Barbara is a graduate of Fordham University School of Law and she earned her undergraduate degree from Princeton University.

Barbara is fluent in English, French, and Italian, and is proficient in Spanish.

Barbara Luse focuses on white collar defense, regulatory enforcement, and corporate transactions, with a particular focus on cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology. Barbara also focuses…

Education

Fordham University School of Law (J.D. 2013); Princeton University (A.B. 2004)

Bar Admissions

New York State; District of Columbia

Activities and Affiliations

Member, Art Law Committee (New York City Bar Association)

Member, Cultural Property Subcommittee (New York City Bar Association)

Co-Chair, Young Patrons Committee, FIAF New York

Member, French American Chamber of Commerce

Member, Neue Galerie Council, New York

Member, Princeton Alumni Association, New York/ Washington, D.C.

Member, New York State Bar Association

Member, District of Columbia Bar Association

C&G welcomes the attorneys who joined the firm in 2017. "We’re very fortunate to have added these exceptional lawyers in New York and Paris," said Managing Partner, Lawrence T Gresser.  "We look forward to continuing to build our transactional and disputes practices in all of our offices in 2018."

John W Gibson, Tim Harris, Barbara K Luse, and Charlotte Ritchie discuss the Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing (Amendment) Regulations 2019 (“the 2019 Regulations”) that recently came into force in the UK.  The 2019 Regulations extend anti-money laundering responsibilities to UK art market participants, including art dealers and other intermediaries, in response to the increasing recognition that high value art is used by criminals and terrorist groups to launder and hide money.