Jeffrey Lang has decades of experience representing clients in securities litigation and complex commercial and financial matters in federal and state courts, as well as in mediation and arbitral proceedings.  Jeffrey has advised on multiple M&A transactions and he has extensive experience representing boards of directors and their special committees in the context of shareholder derivative and class actions and other matters involving corporate governance and fiduciary duties.  Jeffrey regularly represents corporate and individual clients in connection with federal criminal and regulatory investigations, as well as advises boards in connection with internal investigations. 

Prior to joining the firm, Jeffrey practiced at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP and Wachtell Lipton Rosen & Katz and also served as a law clerk to the Hon. Walter J. Cummings, Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.  Jeffrey graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center, where he received the Order of the Coif and was an Articles Editor for the Georgetown Law Journal.

Jeffrey Lang has decades of experience representing clients in securities litigation and complex commercial and financial matters in federal and state courts, as well…

Education

Georgetown University Law Center (J.D., magna cum laude, 1988); Case Western Reserve University (B.A., cum laude, 1985)

Bar Admissions

New York State; U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York; U.S. Tax Court; U.S. Courts of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and the Seventh Circuit

Activities and Affiliations

Member, American Bar Association (Securities Litigation and Mergers and Acquisitions Committees, Litigation and Business Law Sections)

Member, New York State Bar Association

Member, New York City Bar Association

This article addresses one aspect of the United States’ multi-faceted campaign to recover income taxes and penalties on undisclosed offshore accounts – the U.S. Department of Justice’sinvestigation and criminal prosecution of foreign banks that are alleged to have opened and maintained accounts for U.S. taxpayers.  The Department of Justice has argued that by enabling U.S taxpayers to open and maintain accounts that the taxpayers did not report to the Internal Revenue Service, the banks participated in efforts to defraud the United States of taxes owed on the accounts.  The authors examine in particular the impact of the Department of Justice’s Program for Swiss Banks, a voluntary disclosure program negotiated with the Swiss government in which about 100 Swiss banks registered to participate, the extraordinary information being collected, and assess other countries that may become the next focus of investigation.